[Jansky at antenna]
NRAO/AUI image

[Reber telescope]
NRAO/AUI image

[85 foot Tatel telescope]
NRAO/AUI image

[300 foot telescope]
NRAO/AUI image

[140 foot telescope]
NRAO/AUI image

[Green Bank Interferometer]
NRAO/AUI image

[12 meter telescope]
NRAO/AUI image

[VLA]
NRAO/AUI image

[AIPS logo]
NRAO/AUI image

[VLBA antenna 1]
NRAO/AUI image

[Green Bank Telescope]
NRAO/AUI image

[ALMA antennas]
NRAO/AUI image


National Radio Astronomy Observatory Archives: NRAO Timeline


[Image comparison of NVSS, FIRST, and VLASS]

On 7 September 2017 astronomers embarked on the largest observing project in the more than four-decade history of the National Science Foundation’s Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) — a huge survey of the sky that promises a rich scientific payoff over many years. Over the next 7 years, the iconic array of giant dish antennas in the high New Mexico desert will make three complete scans of the sky visible from its latitude — about 80 percent of the entire sky. The survey, called the VLA Sky Survey (VLASS), will produce the sharpest radio view ever made of such a large portion of the sky, and is expected to detect 10 million distinct radio-emitting celestial objects, about four times as many as are now known.

The new VLA Sky Survey (VLASS) sharpens the view. Here is the same radio-emitting object as seen, from left to right, with the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS), the FIRST Survey, and the VLASS. The VLASS image, unlike the others, allows astronomers to positively identify the image as jets of material propelled outward from the center of a galaxy that also is seen in the visible-light Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Technical data: NVSS image at 1.4 GHz in VLA's D configuration; FIRST image at 1.4 GHz in B configuration; VLASS image at 3 GHz in B configuration. Credit: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF./center>

Modified on Tuesday, 19-Sep-2017 09:25:02 EDT by Ellen Bouton