Radio Image of the Crab Nebula

https://www.nrao.edu/archives/plugins/Dropbox/files/CrabNeb_RGB2001_hi.jpg

Description

The Crab Nebula, located in the constellation of Taurus, is the remnant of a supernova in 1054 AD, observed as a "guest star" by ancient Chinese astronomers. The nebula is roughly 10 light-years across, and it is at a distance of about 6,000 light years from earth. It is presently expanding at about 1000 km per second. The supernova explosion left behind a rapidly spinning neutron star, or a pulsar (not discernible in this image). The present remnant is formed from both the material originally thrown off by the star in the supernova explosion, and from a highly energetic wind from the pulsar. It is this wind which energises the nebula, and causes it to emit the radio waves which formed this image. Near the centre, plasma waves move outward from the pulsar at speeds up to half the speed of light.
11 hours of VLA observations in B array, also using earlier observations in C and D arrays. VTESS deconvolution.

Creator

Legacy Astronomical Images

Rights

NRAO/AUI/NSF does not hold full copyright for this image. Contact the archivist for details.

Type

Legacy Astronomical Image

Object Name

M1

Photo Credit

M. Bietenholz

Investigators

M. Bietenholz

Telescope

Very Large Array (VLA)

Observation Date

2001-03-12

Type of Observation

continuum

Band

C

Wavelength

6 cm

Frequency

5.0 GHz

Center of Image

RA 5:31:31.000, Dec: 21:58:54.000 (B1950)

Field of View

0.116667 x 0.116667 degrees

Link to journal article

Notes

Contact the archivist for a high resolution tif of this image.

Series

Galactic Sources Series

Unit

Supernova Remnants Unit

Citation

Legacy Astronomical Images, “Radio Image of the Crab Nebula,” NRAO Archives, accessed December 3, 2021, https://www.nrao.edu/archives/items/show/33521.