Transit of Venus, 2004

P1010003-VenusTransit8june2004.jpg

Description

A transit of Venus occurs when Venus passes between the sun and a superior planet, making Venus visible as a small black dot against the solar disk. Transits of Venus are rare, with two transits eight years apart occurring roughly every 243 years. There were two transits in the 21st century, the first on 8 June 2004 and the other on 5/6 June 2012. In this photo, taken behind the NRAO Technology Center building in Charlottesville in the very early morning on 8 June 2004, are (l-r) Hannah Mangum (feet only!), unidentified, Samantha Mangum (yellow sweater) and Holly Mangum (pink sweater) seated on curb, Mark Adams, Mary Mayo, unidentified (in red bandana), David Duani adjusting the sunspotter, Mary Bridle, Charles Blue, Ellen Bouton, and Pat Murphy. The two (apparently chilly) small boys are unidentified. The sunspotter uses mirrors and a lens to project a solar image onto a white viewing screen. The mini radio telescope is one Charles Blue put together in his father's basement.

Creator

Records of the NRAO

Type

Still Image

Identifier

P1010003-VenusTransit8june2004.jpg

Start Date

2004-06-08

Series

Photographs Series

Unit

NRAO Employees Unit

Subunit

NRAO Social Events Subunit

Tags

Citation

Records of the NRAO, “Transit of Venus, 2004,” NRAO/AUI Archives, accessed April 24, 2024, https://www.nrao.edu/archives/items/show/35234.