A Common Origin for Cosmic Explosions

https://www.nrao.edu/archives/plugins/Dropbox/files/Twinjet_hi.jpg

Description

Artist's conception of the nearby gamma-ray burst of 29 March 2003 localized by NASA's HETE-2 satellite. Radio observations made with the Very Large Array, as well as the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the Ryle Telescope, have been combined with optical and X-ray data to show that this cosmic explosion had a nested jet structure (shown in the figure). The thin core of the jet produced weak gamma-rays while the thicker envelope produced copious radio waves. This information reveals that different types of cosmic explosions (gamma-ray bursts, X-ray flashes, and some type of supernovae) have the same amount of total energy and therefore share a common origin. In effect, different cosmic explosions are "beasts with different faces but the same body".

Creator

Legacy Astronomical Images

Rights

NRAO/AUI/NSF does not hold full copyright for this image. Contact the archivist for details.

Type

Legacy Astronomical Image

Object Name

GRB 030329

Investigators

Edo Berger, et al.

Telescope

Very Large Array (VLA)
ATCA
Ryle
OVRO
IRAM
BIMA

Observation Date

2003-06-04

Type of Observation

continuum

Band

X

Wavelength

3.6 cm

Frequency

8.4 GHz

Center of Image

RA 10:44:50.000, Dec: 21:31:17.800 (J2000)

Field of View

0.083333 x 0.083333 degrees

Link to NRAO Newsletter article

Notes

Contact the archivist for a high resolution tif of this image.

Series

Miscellaneous Series

Unit

Gamma-ray Bursters Unit

Citation

Legacy Astronomical Images, “A Common Origin for Cosmic Explosions,” NRAO Archives, accessed December 3, 2021, https://www.nrao.edu/archives/items/show/33595.